_edited_edited.jpg

DISCURSIVE RESEARCH

I am very interested in studying processes and outcomes in therapy. More specifically, I am fascinated with how discursive methodologies afford us a unique lens to study how we accomplish common therapeutic practices (eg., collaboration, multipartiality, cultivating common ground).  These methods allow us to look closer at how we actually “do” these concepts as we join others in conversation.

See below for more details on why I am drawn to this method of research.

 

A LENS TO STUDY THE CO-CONSTRUCTION IN THERAPEUTIC CONVERSATIONS

For me discursive methods often capture the generative nature of the creative, interactive process of therapy. They allow me to honour the two-way nature of therapeutic conversations in my research. As such, I can replace traditional linear models with an interactive (cyclical) focus which is a strong fit with my family systems perspective. I work from a social constructionist orientation and I find a discursive lens sort of “puts legs” on our conversational constructions. Rather than understanding therapy as delivered by the psychologist I examine interventions in therapy as co-developed as psychologists orient and respond to clients.

USEFUL IN PRACTICE

I have found I have evolved into a more reflexive, responsively involved practitioner after doing and reading this type of research. The detailed descriptions (conversational behaviours are transcribed to the tenth of a second) of interactions are intended to heighten therapists’ sensitivity and abilities to orient to how they can co-develop this movement with families. In my analysis I examine how the therapist together with their client did or accomplished their work. Rather than simply discussing these endeavours (conceptually or theoretically) as facilitative and making general efforts to practice it, practitioners can use discursive research to inform how they might accomplish it.

INTERESTS

PUTTING "LEGS ON" CONVERSATIONAL ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Utilizing a detailed lens to investigate the "taken for granted" ways we join clients to accomplish common therapeutic practices

MEASURING OUTCOMES

Client preferred outcomes evident in therapeutic dialogue

THE UTILITY OF DISCURSIVE RESEARCH

A method for practitioners

SOCIAL JUSTICE AND DIAGNOSTIC CONVERSATIONS

Studying the missed opportunities in diagnostic focused interventions

KARL TOMM'S PRACTICE

Reflections and analysis of the work of Karl Tomm the director of the Calgary Family Therapy Centre

TEACHING SYSTEMIC PRACTICE

Inviting new practitioners to view their work through the "IPscope" at the Calgary Family Therapy Centre

STUDYING THE NEEDS OF STUDENTS

Surveying the needs of adolescents to provide the base for guidance and counselling programming

EQUINE FACILITATED WELLNESS

Partnering with horses in my work with families and individuals